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Thursday, August 27, 2015

Study 329: The Final Chapter

"Truth will come to light; murder cannot be hid long." 
William Shakespeare - Merchant of Venice (1596)

Let's make no bones about it. Study 329 is, and always has been, a ghostwritten publication based on deception and intended to result in financial gain.

The putrid stench of deception has been obliterated, redesigned and is now a sweet smelling single rose, a small token gesture of truth for all those harmed by GlaxoSmithKline's fraudulent 329 study, of which there are many (children and adolescents)

Study 329 is, without doubt, the most infamous of all antidepressant studies. It reeks of deceit, of greed, of dishonesty, of financial kickbacks and has left a slimy trail of death and destruction in its wake.

I have, for my part, written and published many articles on this blog regarding 329. Three of which, Sally K. Laden, The Paxil Ghostwriter Part I, and Sally K. Laden, The Paxil Ghostwriter Part II - Emotional Lability, ending the trilogy in this series with, Sally K. Laden, The Paxil Ghostwriter Part III - Summation. being amongst the most popular.

329 highlights how one company saw a niche in the child depression market and, without due care and consideration, made unfavourable clinical trial results into favourable results.

329 is the spin of all spins, the retraction of which from The Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), has been called for many times.

Now, a group of tenacious researchers have shone a very bright light on what 329 should have revealed. Their findings will be published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) next month.

Meantime, the Study 329 website has been launched and offers some interesting facts about the fraud behind GlaxoSmithKline's darkest hour.

The Restoring Study 329: Efficacy and harms of paroxetine and imipramine in the treatment of adolescent major depression: restoration of a randomised controlled trial, should shock all who care about integrity in drug safety.

Bob Fiddaman.