Monsanto Roundup Lawsuit

Sunday, August 15, 2010

HEAVYWEIGHT ALLI FAILS AT THE WEIGH-IN

Image: thebiglunch.com


It would appear that Glaxo have failed to make the weight for their 'boxing' promotion of their wannabe super-selling diet pill, Alli.

Wood Trade Marks and Designs Limited of London are reporting via their blog that Glaxo have got the maths all wrong on the new packaging of Alli.

To be honest maths gives me a headache but one would expect the legal bods at Glaxo to get their sums right.

Wood Trade Marks and Designs Limited write:

For example, if you are 4’10” then you should not use it unless you weigh over 63kg. They convert this as 9 stone 8 pounds.


However.. 63kg is 138.6 pounds. 10 stones is 140 pounds so you’ll understand it is a just under 10 stones – rounded up it is 9 stone 13 pounds.

Alli Conversion chart

"To see if Alli is right for you..."


I asked Aaron Wood, who writes the Wood Trade Marks and Designs Limited blog, how he stumbled upon the blunder. He told me:

Well my wife uses Alli and we saw that the figures on the back of the pack giving the safe weights for use of the product just didn't reconcile with what we were getting on scales and other conversion systems.


I spent a while trying to work out how they got such an easy bit of maths wrong. I realised they had turned the kg to pounds then just divided by 14. This gets the equivalent stones right, but the number of pounds needs to be converted back.

He added:

My concern is that people who are too light to use it safely will end up taking it because of the mistake.



If Aaron Wood has got his maths right then this is some blunder by Glaxo, particularly if people are being sold Alli who really shouldn't be using it at all due to weight restrictions/warnings.

If Glaxo cannot convert kg to stone then I dread to think what they must be doing with raw data for their other blockbuster drugs.

One has to question the folk at the MHRA too. Surely they check these things? That's what regulators of medicines do, isn't it?

If proved right, both Glaxo and the MHRA owe the public an apology and Aaron Wood should be given the credit for doing the regulators job.




**Alli inserts courtesy of Aaron Wood.

Fid

ORDER THE PAPERBACK
'THE EVIDENCE, HOWEVER, IS CLEAR...THE SEROXAT SCANDAL' By Bob Fiddaman
SIGNED COPIES HERE OR UNSIGNED FROM CHIPMUNKA PUBLISHING
Post a Comment